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Aug. 9, 2022

To Collaborate OR NOT To Collaborate?

To Collaborate OR NOT To Collaborate?

To Collaborate OR NOT to Collaborate as entrepreneurs? 

That is the question that the X.T.C. crew tries to get to the bottom of in this episode. 

As Tristian suggests, "we have to figure out, WHO it is we collaborate with, WHY we want to collaborate with them, and WHEN is the best time to collaborate with them?" 

As it turns out, we each have our own criteria for deciding whether or not to collaborate with someone. And we can be a bit picky too, as we don't collaborate with just anyone. But those whom we do collaborate with have earned it. 

Tune in to find out what it takes to get the members of X.T.C. to collaborate on a professional level. 

Do you share similar criteria for who you do or don't collaborate with? Are you bringing to the table what is necessary for people to want to collaborate with YOU?  

#TheEntrepreneursTrip #XTC #Podcast #Vodcast #Videocast 

Transcript
WEBVTT 1 00:00:00.040 --> 00:00:02.520 For me, I think it comes down to Um. As long as you 2 00:00:02.560 --> 00:00:06.960 trust your collaborators. I'd rather have uh, ten percent of a watermelon than 3 00:00:07.679 --> 00:00:12.080 of a great Um. So again, you can eat more when you have 4 00:00:12.359 --> 00:00:15.839 more people hunting, I guess, is the way to look at it. 5 00:00:15.919 --> 00:00:31.120 So Nuggets. Welcome to the entrepreneurs trip podcast with ex I'm Slanda, I'm 6 00:00:31.199 --> 00:00:39.159 Chris's starting or ruin your business. You may have a destination, but the 7 00:00:39.280 --> 00:00:44.079 journey getting there and be a drid. We want to be your travel companions 8 00:00:44.119 --> 00:00:49.640 and inject a dose of FIXDC as we explore real life conversations about navigating the 9 00:00:49.679 --> 00:01:00.000 world entrepreneurship in the US and the Caribbean. This trip with us. Well, 10 00:01:00.039 --> 00:01:02.719 cool rippers, how are you guys doing? I hope you guys having 11 00:01:02.759 --> 00:01:07.840 a wonderful time. Welcome to another episode of the Entrepreneur Strip, where you're 12 00:01:07.840 --> 00:01:14.840 here kicking it with my girl, I'm Tristan, and there's my homeboy Chris, 13 00:01:15.959 --> 00:01:19.840 and today we're gonna give you a little conversation about to collaborate or not 14 00:01:19.920 --> 00:01:30.159 to collaborate. Before we get there, I need me a drink. All 15 00:01:30.239 --> 00:01:38.079 right, what you're all drinking? What you're all drinking XTC I was drinking. 16 00:01:38.079 --> 00:01:47.079 I'm running a little. You'RE gonna need it's the son. It's evaporating. 17 00:01:47.159 --> 00:01:49.920 It's part of our science project. I was trying to understand how it 18 00:01:49.959 --> 00:01:53.359 works. You know this Texas heat, Virgin Islands Son. You know, 19 00:01:53.439 --> 00:02:00.920 there's a lot going on, a lot, a lot going on. have 20 00:02:00.959 --> 00:02:07.640 to put a cap on those drinks for you. I thought we capted it 21 00:02:07.959 --> 00:02:12.639 like two minutes when we started. A minute like the CAP stop was over. 22 00:02:14.159 --> 00:02:20.360 I'm just having me a nice carbonate and soda, no additives. There 23 00:02:20.439 --> 00:02:28.439 you go. I need have to go with this. I have a I 24 00:02:28.520 --> 00:02:30.280 just have a little tea here, but if I want, I got a 25 00:02:30.919 --> 00:02:34.159 I got a little bottle to, you know, tip in if I, 26 00:02:34.360 --> 00:02:37.960 you know, start getting a little extra Thursday. So that's that's what I'm 27 00:02:38.039 --> 00:02:42.599 Dris said that there's just reminded me of that old bad boys video where they 28 00:02:42.639 --> 00:02:49.919 just had the bottles clicking down. You know, we're not gonna do that. 29 00:02:49.919 --> 00:02:52.759 We're not just gonna like show that we just got stuff sitting on the 30 00:02:52.840 --> 00:02:55.520 side. It's not like we're sitting on a bar just talking about what it 31 00:02:55.560 --> 00:02:59.439 is we sit and while we're tripping, you know, we're I'm here to 32 00:02:59.479 --> 00:03:04.759 talk about collaboration and how well, sometimes that carbonated soda goes good with a 33 00:03:04.800 --> 00:03:12.800 little and maybe vodka sometimes, who knows? Who knows? You have to 34 00:03:12.800 --> 00:03:14.919 be prepared. You got you got the liquor over here, I got my 35 00:03:14.919 --> 00:03:16.919 coffee machine over here, I got water, I got tea. I mean, 36 00:03:17.039 --> 00:03:19.960 you don't know what kind of meeting you're gonna get into. You know. 37 00:03:21.000 --> 00:03:23.560 Never, no, never, no, if he's already prepared for the 38 00:03:23.599 --> 00:03:37.319 hanging before I started. So let's not unpacked this conversation. Yeah, how 39 00:03:37.319 --> 00:03:43.719 about to collaborate or not to collaborate? A little smirk out the side of 40 00:03:43.719 --> 00:03:49.039 the cheek, collever, right or not to collaboration, because we we already 41 00:03:49.039 --> 00:03:52.479 had a conversation offline, so we need to get our listeners up to speed 42 00:03:53.120 --> 00:03:59.479 the first part. I'm not sure where this conversation is gonna go, but 43 00:03:59.520 --> 00:04:02.840 I'm gonna give guys are definitely disclaimer. Whatever happens on this episode stays on 44 00:04:02.919 --> 00:04:06.919 this episode. You just wanna dropical like and a little like box. Click 45 00:04:08.000 --> 00:04:13.000 that times off and drop a comment. Let me know that I'm right and 46 00:04:13.039 --> 00:04:15.840 if Shelana is right. You guys, I don't know. You guys, 47 00:04:15.840 --> 00:04:18.279 Click Louver sign. See. So she just sip the mind of business. 48 00:04:18.319 --> 00:04:20.959 She's like, I'm already right. All right, guys. So we're here. 49 00:04:21.000 --> 00:04:25.959 We want to talk about collaborating just a little bit, just a little 50 00:04:25.959 --> 00:04:29.480 bit Um, and it's gonna lead into another this discussion, for sure, 51 00:04:29.519 --> 00:04:31.079 for sure, but I just want you guys to sit tight and bear with 52 00:04:31.160 --> 00:04:35.600 us through this one. So, for me, collaborating is the action of 53 00:04:35.720 --> 00:04:45.480 working with someone to produce or create something, and I find it very hard 54 00:04:45.519 --> 00:04:49.240 to determine when to collaborate. And the reason why I find it very hard 55 00:04:49.319 --> 00:04:55.439 to figure out when to collaborate is because I love collaborating. I love bringing 56 00:04:55.439 --> 00:04:58.360 people in on projects, I love just working with other people to try and 57 00:04:58.360 --> 00:05:01.879 get things done. Um, different point of views, different fields, a 58 00:05:01.879 --> 00:05:05.399 little more creativity, and I feel like whoever it is you're collaborating with, 59 00:05:05.759 --> 00:05:12.040 you're collaborating with them because there's someone you believe and trust that you could learn 60 00:05:12.199 --> 00:05:16.920 something from. Like I'm on the entrepreneurship collaborating with Solana because I like her, 61 00:05:17.439 --> 00:05:40.680 but because I know I can learn a lot of time management from but 62 00:05:41.000 --> 00:05:46.240 you know, I like with Chris, someone I love collaborating you know he's 63 00:05:46.279 --> 00:05:50.399 a free spirit, but sometimes it at least lead to our detriment. So 64 00:05:50.439 --> 00:05:55.040 at different points in time we've got to figure out, just like the clients, 65 00:05:55.439 --> 00:05:58.519 Um, that we want, we also got to figure out who it 66 00:05:58.600 --> 00:06:02.519 is to collaborate with, why we want to collaborate with them and when it 67 00:06:02.639 --> 00:06:06.000 is the best time to collaborate with them. You know, I'm thinking about 68 00:06:06.000 --> 00:06:09.959 it now shelanna and what I think a lot of people don't know. Shelana 69 00:06:09.959 --> 00:06:14.319 and I collaborate and a lot of projects together, a lot of projects together. 70 00:06:14.439 --> 00:06:17.279 I'm thinking about a little snapshots by the waterfront, Um, the ones 71 00:06:17.319 --> 00:06:23.079 in the office. Is Um, just US running around coffee table snapchat to 72 00:06:23.279 --> 00:06:26.720 friends. That's friends. That's not really friends because they don't show up the 73 00:06:26.759 --> 00:06:30.079 coffee time. But we're not going to do that to them, right. 74 00:06:30.639 --> 00:06:32.240 We're not going to call Pam out, are we, Shalana? WE'RE gonna 75 00:06:32.240 --> 00:06:36.600 CALL PIM? Are we gonna call okay, so we're not calling our friends 76 00:06:36.639 --> 00:06:43.399 out on this episode. Um, but that's what but actually, Um, 77 00:06:43.600 --> 00:06:46.439 truly, just just a little bit Um. When is it that you guys 78 00:06:46.480 --> 00:06:50.519 determine when it is that you wanna collaborate? Chris I'll let you go first. 79 00:06:51.800 --> 00:06:57.279 I think the biggest part, and and this is tough to you come 80 00:06:57.319 --> 00:06:59.720 by. So it's not you know, something you can just go out and 81 00:06:59.720 --> 00:07:04.759 find right now, but it's finding the people that you trust enough to collaborate 82 00:07:04.839 --> 00:07:10.959 with Um, where you feel that your brand is um and that you as 83 00:07:11.000 --> 00:07:15.160 a person, as well as the entrepreneur, are going to be represented in 84 00:07:15.199 --> 00:07:18.319 front of Um. You know, a client or or or that you're the 85 00:07:18.360 --> 00:07:23.959 same amount of work and effort Um is going to go into the project from 86 00:07:23.959 --> 00:07:27.959 those people who you are collaborating with, because it's sort of that Um, 87 00:07:29.079 --> 00:07:30.839 that like class project thing, you know, where you get assigned a group. 88 00:07:31.879 --> 00:07:35.720 You get assigned a group and all of a sudden three out of the 89 00:07:36.160 --> 00:07:40.560 four or five members are the ones who end up doing the entire project, 90 00:07:40.560 --> 00:07:44.160 but everybody gets credit for it. That doesn't leave too many people feeling happy 91 00:07:44.199 --> 00:07:46.959 at the end of it. So it's but if you but if you're able 92 00:07:46.000 --> 00:07:49.680 to select your group and you don't just do it as as friends but as 93 00:07:49.680 --> 00:07:53.000 people that you know, you're like, Hey, I know that we can 94 00:07:53.160 --> 00:07:56.680 like crush this project if I work with this person, this person, this 95 00:07:56.720 --> 00:08:01.560 person and that person. Then to me that is when you collaborate, is 96 00:08:01.560 --> 00:08:05.160 when you find a team that can help take the project to a place, 97 00:08:05.720 --> 00:08:09.920 uh, that is better than where you feel you could have taken about yourself. 98 00:08:11.959 --> 00:08:16.480 Totally totally agree with that. One of the ways I don't collaborate with 99 00:08:16.519 --> 00:08:20.000 everybody because I know that I'm not the easiest person to work with, right, 100 00:08:20.000 --> 00:08:31.079 I really like, I mean, but you're really phenomenal to work but 101 00:08:31.160 --> 00:08:33.360 like really like super easy. But I think, I think that's where it 102 00:08:33.360 --> 00:08:37.960 comes to the value alignment, though, in Tristan right, like for me, 103 00:08:37.279 --> 00:08:41.320 time is very important because it's the only resource that we cannot get back. 104 00:08:41.399 --> 00:08:45.679 We can make money back, you know, we can get another client, 105 00:08:46.039 --> 00:08:48.039 we can buy resources back, but time we can't get back, and 106 00:08:48.080 --> 00:08:52.679 so that's one of my pet peeves. Like my time is valuable, especially 107 00:08:52.759 --> 00:08:56.000 all of us as entrepreneurs where we have multiple things going on. I need 108 00:08:56.080 --> 00:09:01.320 to work with collaborators who value time. You know, you spoke about it 109 00:09:01.360 --> 00:09:05.559 in a previous episode. When we have a shoot at seven thirty, we're 110 00:09:05.639 --> 00:09:11.559 there seven o quack, so that you can start at seven clients. Time 111 00:09:11.639 --> 00:09:16.679 is important, but so is ours. Right. Um, the other thing 112 00:09:16.759 --> 00:09:22.480 that's important for me with collaboration is producing quality output. Whatever it is that 113 00:09:22.519 --> 00:09:28.080 we're working on needs to make all of us look amazing and not to be 114 00:09:28.240 --> 00:09:31.480 half stepping that, like, is another one of my pet peeves. And 115 00:09:31.519 --> 00:09:37.039 then I think the last pet peeve for me is that a lot of the 116 00:09:37.039 --> 00:09:43.600 projects I do with people who am considering collaborating with our passion projects that I 117 00:09:43.679 --> 00:09:48.519 might do at no cost. And if I feel, if I feel you're 118 00:09:48.759 --> 00:09:52.440 motivated by money, like you will work your ass off if we have a 119 00:09:52.440 --> 00:10:00.639 paid project, but you're gonna skimp on a Pro Bono project, that tells 120 00:10:00.679 --> 00:10:03.879 me our values on our line, because the quality that I produced on a 121 00:10:03.960 --> 00:10:07.320 pro Bono project is the same as I'm going to produce on aid project. 122 00:10:07.600 --> 00:10:13.000 You know what I mean? So I think, yeah, so quality your 123 00:10:13.200 --> 00:10:22.759 time and don't give me a headache because I'm trying to build capacity. Right. 124 00:10:24.159 --> 00:10:26.840 So we're helping each other build capacity and to your point, Chris, 125 00:10:26.960 --> 00:10:31.639 like, we're able to produce something better, greater than we could do on 126 00:10:31.639 --> 00:10:35.879 our by ourselves. And so for me that's some of the key things I 127 00:10:35.919 --> 00:10:37.799 look for when I'm collaborating. So I don't have a lot of collaborators. 128 00:10:39.440 --> 00:10:45.799 I got I got really good any ones? Yeah, but I want to 129 00:10:45.840 --> 00:10:50.039 go. I want you guys to keep them this in mind. At exactly 130 00:10:50.080 --> 00:10:54.159 three minutes and thirty seconds on the clock, I watch you guys to just 131 00:10:54.240 --> 00:10:58.320 remember what it is Shelana said at that moment. All right, just remember, 132 00:10:58.000 --> 00:11:01.200 you're going to skim back to three thirty. No, no, no, 133 00:11:01.240 --> 00:11:03.159 we're not going to run the clock back and just letting them know you're 134 00:11:03.159 --> 00:11:07.919 gonna want to look back at three thirty a little later an episode. Um, 135 00:11:07.960 --> 00:11:11.320 but Chris, like you guys said, though, and we plan our 136 00:11:11.320 --> 00:11:15.840 episodes. We do speak about it. However, we don't do it collectively 137 00:11:16.000 --> 00:11:20.320 all the time, and it's funny how it is our views a line, 138 00:11:20.360 --> 00:11:22.840 because when we when I thought about the collaboration, when I think out about 139 00:11:24.039 --> 00:11:28.759 was definitely that class school project right, if anybody asked them to. Let 140 00:11:28.799 --> 00:11:31.840 you guys know, I'm the slack of the group. I got to two 141 00:11:31.960 --> 00:11:37.039 wonderful collaborators. SAVANDA lets us know whatever it is. Sometimes I seek calls 142 00:11:37.200 --> 00:11:41.399 Chris to be like Yo Chris, when I missed you know, and and 143 00:11:41.559 --> 00:11:48.360 Chris just works for the project together and then the time comes in and they're 144 00:11:48.360 --> 00:11:52.039 like Yo, Christan just go up there and speak and I'm like, so, 145 00:11:52.080 --> 00:11:54.000 this is what I'm gonna do. All right. So we spoke about 146 00:11:54.000 --> 00:11:58.440 when it is that we do want to collaborate, but is there any red 147 00:11:58.480 --> 00:12:03.200 flags that you guys look at quickly to know, Um, these might be 148 00:12:03.240 --> 00:12:05.639 people we don't want to collaborate with? I mean, Silana, you touch 149 00:12:05.720 --> 00:12:11.519 on it a little bit with skimping on passion projects and not Um, pay 150 00:12:11.600 --> 00:12:16.200 projects. But is there anything else? Lack of responsiveness? I'm big on 151 00:12:16.279 --> 00:12:20.159 time management, but I'm even bigger on communication. My thing is over communicate 152 00:12:20.279 --> 00:12:26.279 with me. I'm okay with that, but when I hear crickets that and 153 00:12:26.480 --> 00:12:31.639 the project can't move forward like, that's, Um, that's when I need 154 00:12:31.679 --> 00:12:35.399 to start, you know, pouring some look here into my drink because, 155 00:12:37.000 --> 00:12:41.799 yeah, because I started to lose my ship. Like it's common decency to 156 00:12:41.919 --> 00:12:46.720 just communicate, you know, especially when you're on a time bound project right 157 00:12:46.759 --> 00:12:50.360 which a lot of us do project based work. And if so, for 158 00:12:50.399 --> 00:12:54.759 example, I'm on a project right now for a month and we have a 159 00:12:54.799 --> 00:12:58.840 certain set of deliverables that need to happen with the client when I solidify that 160 00:13:00.039 --> 00:13:05.840 contract. I picked a collaborator that I know is even more of an orrible 161 00:13:05.039 --> 00:13:11.799 communicated than I am, who is more conscious about time as I am, 162 00:13:11.840 --> 00:13:15.279 because I know I'm not gonna have to worry about those aspects when it comes 163 00:13:15.279 --> 00:13:18.240 to the project. Our job is, my job would be to stay on 164 00:13:18.279 --> 00:13:20.559 top of the client to make sure they're responding on time, right, but 165 00:13:20.639 --> 00:13:24.000 now with the collaborator I don't have to worry about that. So a collaborator 166 00:13:24.039 --> 00:13:31.360 should really ease some of the worry that comes with the project. MM HMM. 167 00:13:31.120 --> 00:13:43.440 Question about the detour the time management this segment. Alright, guys. 168 00:13:43.440 --> 00:13:46.919 So we're talking about the beauty of Um collaborating and how a lot of people 169 00:13:46.960 --> 00:13:50.600 sometimes like to work together, but other people, but not all the time, 170 00:13:50.600 --> 00:13:52.399 it works out the way that we wanted to work out, you know. 171 00:13:52.759 --> 00:13:56.200 So we're just gonna quick little scope about how it is or flags that 172 00:13:56.279 --> 00:14:01.080 we look for that determined. Those factors are where it is with my pump 173 00:14:01.080 --> 00:14:05.600 out brakes. are working with a collaborator. Go ahead, Chris. I 174 00:14:05.639 --> 00:14:09.120 think uh Somehe so much sure what Salando was saying. But also, in 175 00:14:09.159 --> 00:14:13.200 addition to or and this is part of the communication, but having clear expectations 176 00:14:13.279 --> 00:14:18.720 for how you want me to collaborate with you and and vice versa, like 177 00:14:18.919 --> 00:14:22.039 why am I being chosen to work on this project versus somebody else? And 178 00:14:22.039 --> 00:14:26.360 why am I or why am I bringing somebody on a project versus somebody else? 179 00:14:26.519 --> 00:14:28.919 Um, and just kind of like the thing that where my brain goes 180 00:14:28.960 --> 00:14:33.480 to is I was brought on to work on a music video for like a 181 00:14:33.559 --> 00:14:37.200 music producer. He was starting his music production career and I was like sure, 182 00:14:37.320 --> 00:14:39.759 like, I'll be happy to be a second shooter and come in and 183 00:14:39.799 --> 00:14:43.559 help you out. Um, got on that project and basically in front of 184 00:14:43.600 --> 00:14:48.759 the clients, so the music artists, Um, and the guy was like 185 00:14:48.799 --> 00:14:50.320 okay, so like Chris, like what do you want to shoot? How 186 00:14:50.360 --> 00:14:54.960 do you want to do this? And I was like Whoa, okay, 187 00:14:54.000 --> 00:15:01.159 so now I'm I'm leading the production and basically ended up being where the person 188 00:15:01.240 --> 00:15:03.480 ended up. Uh, you know who who brought me onto the shoot ended 189 00:15:03.559 --> 00:15:07.120 up actually putting down his camera at one point and just like sitting down like 190 00:15:07.159 --> 00:15:13.320 watching me do the shoot. Uh. So to me, that was Um, 191 00:15:13.399 --> 00:15:16.039 my big red flag of like something I wouldn't do again, which is 192 00:15:16.360 --> 00:15:18.039 walking and just spending Oh yeah, sure, I'll be happy to just show 193 00:15:18.120 --> 00:15:22.200 up and help, unless we've established that trust where like like a Salander, 194 00:15:22.240 --> 00:15:26.559 Tristan, if you're like hey, just show up here at this time, 195 00:15:26.960 --> 00:15:28.960 on this day, you'll thank me later. I trust you, guys. 196 00:15:30.000 --> 00:15:31.879 I will show up, you know on that. But to somebody I haven't 197 00:15:31.919 --> 00:15:35.399 worked with yet, it's like, okay, well, hold on, what 198 00:15:35.480 --> 00:15:37.639 day? What time? Why are we doing this? What am I going 199 00:15:37.679 --> 00:15:39.480 to do? What do I need to bring? What are my expectations? 200 00:15:39.480 --> 00:15:43.200 You know what I mean, like what do I need to prepare for Um? 201 00:15:43.279 --> 00:15:46.879 And that that to me, is the biggest UH factor. Is Um, 202 00:15:46.039 --> 00:15:50.960 you know? Is there a clear outset of a what the project is 203 00:15:50.000 --> 00:15:54.559 and be what my role is in that project? So you get a prenup 204 00:15:54.799 --> 00:15:58.559 for exactly. Definitely. But I want to show you, guys, I'm 205 00:15:58.639 --> 00:16:03.320 in Quick Chris, you ready for this? So what I do believe in 206 00:16:03.519 --> 00:16:07.559 is making sure, as a collaborator. Now we understand the scope. Chris, 207 00:16:07.600 --> 00:16:10.320 I gave you something and I want you to just like short, really 208 00:16:10.399 --> 00:16:12.559 quickly if you can. You got about a minute. It's gonna take forty 209 00:16:12.559 --> 00:16:15.679 five seconds. So there's a lot of space. This is gonna be beautiful. 210 00:16:15.799 --> 00:16:18.919 So I want you to look at this moment as it slowly comes into 211 00:16:19.000 --> 00:16:25.240 focus. Right, I told you, guys about the three minute mark Um 212 00:16:25.240 --> 00:16:27.039 of the first segment. You'RE gonna go back there, when she was talking 213 00:16:27.080 --> 00:16:33.360 about working with collaborators that believe certain things and passion projects and stuff like that, 214 00:16:33.559 --> 00:16:36.840 something like that. So, Shelana, I just want you to tell 215 00:16:36.919 --> 00:16:41.159 us how you feel about what it is you just saw and you could go 216 00:16:41.200 --> 00:16:49.200 back and pro Bono project. Oh, I'm sorry, it was not a 217 00:16:49.200 --> 00:16:56.639 pro bono project. No, I'm not. Was gonna happen. That was 218 00:16:56.679 --> 00:17:03.200 a project with other people, right, with others to collaborate with you. 219 00:17:03.200 --> 00:17:08.000 Yes, you tried to collaborate with me on however, I had set expectations 220 00:17:08.079 --> 00:17:12.480 early on that, you know, for the video. It needs to be 221 00:17:12.519 --> 00:17:18.640 compensated right, and this is the beauty of collaborating, and this is what 222 00:17:18.720 --> 00:17:22.559 Chris was speaking to. It's making sure that we understand the scope, that 223 00:17:22.920 --> 00:17:27.920 both collaborators are on the same page and one is not telling you I will 224 00:17:29.000 --> 00:17:33.359 not cash the check and the other one is telling you you're going to cash 225 00:17:33.400 --> 00:17:36.160 the check. So I just want you to know, because you wrote the 226 00:17:36.279 --> 00:17:37.920 video, it kind of kicked my clock back and this is the one time 227 00:17:38.200 --> 00:17:42.000 that I'm happy that we got a detour from the Detour Ali guys. Love 228 00:17:42.039 --> 00:17:53.359 you guys. Let's get some superneros on this trip. No, no, 229 00:17:53.599 --> 00:18:03.400 you just took in, took in of you where it's here. Oh No, 230 00:18:11.359 --> 00:18:17.119 my number one souvenir that your collaborator is going to accept your payment once 231 00:18:17.279 --> 00:18:25.119 you give that much. But I mean, okay. So on a serious 232 00:18:25.160 --> 00:18:27.960 note, even though you didn't cast a check and you burned it so dramatically 233 00:18:29.079 --> 00:18:33.000 for the you know, the for the video. You know. At least 234 00:18:33.119 --> 00:18:37.119 you know. No, at least you know. I value your time, 235 00:18:37.200 --> 00:18:41.880 I value your expertise and I have value what you bring to the table, 236 00:18:41.000 --> 00:18:48.079 because any time I show that video to somebody, they are thoroughly impressed, 237 00:18:48.279 --> 00:18:55.920 thoroughly, thoroughly impressed. So when we talk about quality of output beyond, 238 00:18:56.319 --> 00:19:00.079 I mean I showed it to somebody who has a very creative, artistic eye 239 00:19:00.200 --> 00:19:04.559 up to last week. They're in video and photography as well, and they 240 00:19:04.599 --> 00:19:11.759 were raving about the colors, how bright and crisp and clean everything was. 241 00:19:11.039 --> 00:19:15.680 But that's that's to my point, right that I was making earlier. When 242 00:19:15.680 --> 00:19:21.039 it comes to my collaboration, I look at quality, I look at respecting 243 00:19:21.039 --> 00:19:26.559 our time and I look at communication. Those are three critical areas when you're 244 00:19:26.599 --> 00:19:33.680 collaborating with anybody. And also value alignment. Right. It's another one that 245 00:19:33.720 --> 00:19:37.200 we kind of hinted on but did not really say explicitly, that there needs 246 00:19:37.200 --> 00:19:44.319 to be a value alignment with your collaborators. For example, this podcast that 247 00:19:44.359 --> 00:19:48.119 we're doing, none of us are getting paid for it. We do it 248 00:19:48.240 --> 00:19:53.079 because we want to bring value to the entrepreneurship community. Is there an opportunity 249 00:19:53.079 --> 00:19:57.680 to money from it? Absolutely, but we're getting to, you know, 250 00:19:59.119 --> 00:20:06.160 swim to other on this project in a pro bono situation until it possibly materializes 251 00:20:06.200 --> 00:20:11.799 and then we can bank. Right. Right, so and one of the 252 00:20:11.799 --> 00:20:17.880 others. It's another example why it's great to collaborate with people who are experts 253 00:20:17.880 --> 00:20:22.160 in their field. Right, agree. I agree. I was gonna say 254 00:20:22.200 --> 00:20:26.559 is that it also gives us the opportunity to show them what the entrepreneurship is 255 00:20:26.599 --> 00:20:32.599 really about. It's really about sometimes collaborating with others, our views, our 256 00:20:32.680 --> 00:20:37.880 values online to sometimes give a project or give of ourselves, not necessarily for 257 00:20:37.039 --> 00:20:44.200 monetarily monetary values right off the bad but just building something that we can see 258 00:20:44.240 --> 00:20:47.160 in the future, and that's what it means to collaborate, like I said, 259 00:20:47.160 --> 00:20:52.160 the action of working with someone to create or produce something, and that's 260 00:20:52.160 --> 00:20:56.319 what it is that we're doing, Um, and you definitely set it. 261 00:20:56.799 --> 00:21:00.279 I do know that you respect my time, I do know that you respect 262 00:21:00.640 --> 00:21:04.839 and value me as a person and as a business Um, and that's why, 263 00:21:04.960 --> 00:21:11.440 for me, seeing you once again investing in something, trying to build 264 00:21:11.519 --> 00:21:15.640 something, I had no problem saying that I'll collaborate. You know, Yours, 265 00:21:15.680 --> 00:21:18.759 my big SIST, was out there trying to, I want to say, 266 00:21:18.799 --> 00:21:22.119 graduating, doing so much things at the same time that I mean to 267 00:21:22.200 --> 00:21:25.519 me. It's not even I don't want to say it's not even fair to 268 00:21:25.559 --> 00:21:27.680 say that something would have been our fear, but it's for me to let 269 00:21:27.720 --> 00:21:30.400 you know that I do believe in what it is that you're doing and do 270 00:21:30.519 --> 00:21:34.200 believe in the work that you're putting forth. You know, Um, and 271 00:21:34.240 --> 00:21:37.920 what it is that you do also. So I'm only gonna give Chris about 272 00:21:37.960 --> 00:21:41.759 ten seconds to think about what it is that you want to share with us, 273 00:21:41.240 --> 00:21:45.279 and have taken the few moments. You know, you already started with 274 00:21:45.319 --> 00:21:49.480 them in this segment. So we're gonna let you do it again in the 275 00:21:49.559 --> 00:22:00.440 next sounds good. That's going to take in the view. All right. 276 00:22:02.240 --> 00:22:07.039 So this is just a Um, a Chinese proverb, unattributed Um currently, 277 00:22:07.079 --> 00:22:11.920 so I don't know the author, but it is only when all contribute their 278 00:22:11.920 --> 00:22:17.160 firewood can they build a strong fire. It takes a group of people to 279 00:22:17.200 --> 00:22:26.839 build something that will last. Only when all contribute their firewood can they build 280 00:22:26.839 --> 00:22:32.400 a strong fire. It takes a group of people to build something that will 281 00:22:32.480 --> 00:22:34.559 last. I did I had a couple of quote options. I went with 282 00:22:34.599 --> 00:22:42.920 that one. Just you know. We're we're on fire today. But it 283 00:22:44.160 --> 00:22:47.799 does go back to the point of Um. When all contribute the firewood, 284 00:22:47.799 --> 00:22:52.759 it's not people sitting around the fire who didn't contribute the firewood or who, 285 00:22:52.920 --> 00:22:56.880 you know, didn't help go find the wood. It is everybody brought something 286 00:22:56.079 --> 00:23:02.160 to the fire and as a result it's a much bigger fire than we could 287 00:23:02.200 --> 00:23:04.079 have built just on our own. And that kind of goes back to, 288 00:23:04.119 --> 00:23:07.000 you know, where where we started with Um. You know this podcast is 289 00:23:07.079 --> 00:23:15.160 how how does this uh coming together builds upon what we can do by ourselves? 290 00:23:15.160 --> 00:23:17.440 How does it enhance it? Um, you know, we were talking 291 00:23:17.440 --> 00:23:19.839 about prenups and stuff. So we're just going a relationship thing. There's a 292 00:23:19.880 --> 00:23:22.920 lot of people who say, you know, Oh, there, um, 293 00:23:22.000 --> 00:23:26.559 that person is my my other half, or that person makes me whole. 294 00:23:26.119 --> 00:23:29.960 Um. The way I always look at it is, no, it's it's 295 00:23:30.000 --> 00:23:33.720 fifty fifty. If like we're coming together. To me, a strong relationship 296 00:23:33.799 --> 00:23:37.599 is when, by being together, you are able to do more or achieve 297 00:23:37.759 --> 00:23:41.720 or accomplish things greater than you could do by yourself. Um. So it's 298 00:23:41.720 --> 00:23:45.240 not and nobody's taking anything from you, they're adding to and that is when 299 00:23:45.400 --> 00:23:49.119 when to collaborate, as we've talked here, is when you find those people 300 00:23:49.119 --> 00:23:53.000 that you can trust, like Salanda in Tristan here where again. Um, 301 00:23:53.359 --> 00:23:56.720 we just know that. Uh, if I'm if I, you know, 302 00:23:56.920 --> 00:23:59.960 have somebody say hey, like we need to build a big fire, when 303 00:24:00.000 --> 00:24:02.440 you to build it? Now, I'm calling trist in Shellan, because I 304 00:24:02.480 --> 00:24:06.000 know they're going to bring wood for the fire and we're gonna and you know, 305 00:24:06.079 --> 00:24:11.079 and we're gonna benefit exactly multiplier effects for sure. Yeah, it's more 306 00:24:11.079 --> 00:24:15.599 than just three, because even when we, you know, think of collaborating, 307 00:24:15.599 --> 00:24:18.160 and I know where we have a short term on the clock but when 308 00:24:18.160 --> 00:24:23.960 we collaborate and we have this level of trust whenever opportunities come up, because 309 00:24:25.039 --> 00:24:30.079 we know that if we refer our collaborator they're gonna do good work, we're 310 00:24:30.119 --> 00:24:34.480 more willing to do that right because, even though we've done pro bono stuff, 311 00:24:34.519 --> 00:24:40.920 I've brought in all my collaborators on other paid projects that I'm working on 312 00:24:41.400 --> 00:24:44.599 because I know they're going to produce quality work and they're gonna make me look 313 00:24:44.599 --> 00:24:49.599 good and they're gonna benefit. So it's kind of paying it forward. Tristan, 314 00:24:49.640 --> 00:24:55.200 how about you? What comes to mind is we all lose when the 315 00:24:55.279 --> 00:25:00.599 family pews, and for me that's what it is. Our family collaborators and 316 00:25:00.640 --> 00:25:03.319 that's what it is. So when we come together and we work together, 317 00:25:03.359 --> 00:25:07.640 we achieved so much more. We build and go so much more farther than 318 00:25:07.839 --> 00:25:12.839 like you're saying, US building that fire pit by ourselves like, and you 319 00:25:12.880 --> 00:25:17.319 were speaking about it being the fifty fifty. For me, I never really 320 00:25:17.359 --> 00:25:19.559 look at anything as fifty fifty. It might be a sixty forty, a 321 00:25:19.680 --> 00:25:25.599 seventy thirty. However, without that thirty in that seventy, you're still gonna 322 00:25:25.640 --> 00:25:30.279 make the hundred, without that forty from the sixty we still work to get 323 00:25:30.359 --> 00:25:33.160 that hundred percent. And that's just where it is that we're at. Um. 324 00:25:33.680 --> 00:25:37.559 We have to acknowledge and work efficiently with each other, and that's why 325 00:25:37.559 --> 00:25:41.200 it is we collaborate, is because if I was doing it by myself, 326 00:25:41.240 --> 00:25:45.200 it's gonna take a way longer. Shelana never looks back and it's like, 327 00:25:45.599 --> 00:25:48.599 you know what, you'sing, Um, we're gonna do this, drop this 328 00:25:48.680 --> 00:25:52.960 here, we're gonna put this there, we're gonna slano just kind of throws 329 00:25:52.039 --> 00:25:55.519 it up. She's like, you know what, and this is this is 330 00:25:55.519 --> 00:25:59.839 the beauty of the most structured person, is when they could just like toss 331 00:26:00.000 --> 00:26:03.680 of the project. And what what resonates with me is just the deadline. 332 00:26:03.720 --> 00:26:08.240 She's like look, by Friday I need to see something, and now she 333 00:26:08.359 --> 00:26:14.920 speaks about this communication. It just don't leave me. She knows by Friday 334 00:26:15.039 --> 00:26:18.920 she would have something earlier. Well, before this podcast we've been talking about 335 00:26:19.079 --> 00:26:23.079 Zen Times to me like that three o'clock for thirty in the morning, wake 336 00:26:23.160 --> 00:26:26.799 up, where you get things done. Shelana knows at four o'clock, four 337 00:26:26.880 --> 00:26:30.319 thirty, she might be getting that draft. She's like, oh no, 338 00:26:30.839 --> 00:26:33.480 I want to change this. Um, you might have spent this person's name 339 00:26:33.519 --> 00:26:37.880 wrong or you didn't do by the eight o'clock, by the time that the 340 00:26:37.920 --> 00:26:42.440 project needs to be there. I'm not even sure. Shelan, the sweats, 341 00:26:42.759 --> 00:26:45.400 you know, but I'm sweating because I know I want to make sure 342 00:26:45.799 --> 00:26:49.400 she gets a project in hand and then I just get a little sweet thank 343 00:26:49.400 --> 00:26:53.599 you and then it's a stella like it was bomb, it was this, 344 00:26:53.640 --> 00:26:57.720 it was that, but it couldn't be those things if we didn't collaborate. 345 00:26:59.079 --> 00:27:03.680 It couldn't be those if I then to have someone that set up those interview 346 00:27:03.759 --> 00:27:07.119 times. Um, that kept its structured. Patrisan, you know, this 347 00:27:07.200 --> 00:27:11.319 is a great interview, Chris, Seems Pretty Amazing at all. Well, 348 00:27:11.880 --> 00:27:15.359 we gotta go. We got another interview waiting for us at this time, 349 00:27:15.319 --> 00:27:18.880 and it's just that the beauty of the structured. Nobody's gonna believe surround that. 350 00:27:18.960 --> 00:27:22.680 That's exactly why you got kicked out of the all group this morning. 351 00:27:22.480 --> 00:27:26.519 It had nothing to do with anything. We had to just double check the 352 00:27:26.599 --> 00:27:37.039 video vernon check. Was there technical difficulties? All right, this is the 353 00:27:37.079 --> 00:27:41.079 beauty of that collaboration, but I'm not going to run this segment off to 354 00:27:41.200 --> 00:27:44.119 too much longer, Chris, I'm gonna let you wrap us. Well, 355 00:27:44.160 --> 00:27:47.519 yeah, no, I and again this was a great episode about collaborating or 356 00:27:47.519 --> 00:27:49.720 not to collaborate. For me, I think it comes down to Um. 357 00:27:49.720 --> 00:27:53.799 As long as you trust your collaborators. I'd rather have uh, ten percent 358 00:27:53.839 --> 00:27:59.720 of a watermelon than of a great Um. So again, if you can 359 00:27:59.759 --> 00:28:03.920 eat more when you have more people hunting, I guess is the way to 360 00:28:03.079 --> 00:28:14.519 look at it. So any last thoughts from the x or the T go? 361 00:28:14.680 --> 00:28:22.680 Ten percent of the watermeltain, Tristan. I'm done, Mike, I'm 362 00:28:22.720 --> 00:28:29.599 done. All right, trippers, thank you so much for joining us here 363 00:28:29.799 --> 00:28:33.480 on this episode of you know, to to collaborate or not to collaborate. 364 00:28:33.839 --> 00:28:38.319 And next week we're getting into delegation, so we'll see them another game. 365 00:28:38.400 --> 00:28:48.519 That's SLANA. But yeah, thank you for taking this trip with us. 366 00:28:48.920 --> 00:28:52.319 We hope you had a great time. Join US every Tuesday for another bills 367 00:28:52.720 --> 00:28:59.920 past and don't forget to like to share and puspire. Be Sure to follow 368 00:29:00.039 --> 00:29:06.119 us on Facebook, instagram and visit us at the entrepreneurs trips dot com from 369 00:29:06.119 --> 00:29:10.000 what entrepreneurship texts and trips to see you next time,